#decolonizeeducation

601 posts tagged with #decolonizeeducation

Photos and Videos about #decolonizeeducation

(@bohobellenoire)

17 Hours Ago

🤓🇬🇧🤓 Had a great nerding out day at this research dissemination conference on diversity & inclusion policy & best practices in the UK...& met some rockstar WOC british soul sistas also in the constant struggle of combating white (male) privilege in our institutions 💁🏻‍♀️💁🏽‍♀️💁🏾‍♀️💁🏿‍♀️ #representationmatters #diversityinhighered #recviews #decolonizeeducation

(@_l.l.th)

1 Day 13 Hours Ago

Ready for conference season thanks to @yvettedontlie!

(@zieraad)

1 Day 23 Hours Ago

Expanding our mission! In de tweede helft van dit schooljaar zullen we gastlessen verzorgen aan de lerarenopleiding Geschiedenis bij de HvA. We zullen toekomstige geschiedenis docenten kennis laten maken met ons lesprogramma Ancestors Unknown en met hen nagaan wat ze in huis moeten hebben om met leerlingen te begeleiden in hun zoektocht naar voorouders en familiegeschiedenis. We zien ernaar uit! #ancestorsunknown #gedeeldegeschiedenis #decolonizeeducation

(@redrisingeducation)

2 Days 7 Hours Ago

Stay tuned for #redrisingfreedomschool creator @tasha.spillett ‘s debut graphic novel, Surviving the City, coming out this winter❄️🙌🏽👏🏽 #redrisingeducation #indigenousliteracy #graphicnovel #literacy #decolonizeeducation

“Anywhere” [else] may well have been appropriate, as I have to admit, in 2011, my 20-year old self was even less aware of the world than I am now. I had decided to live and study in Europe by myself three years prior to this photo after 17 years of back and forth between my parents in Serbia and Australia/New Zealand. Only by looking back do I realise how much I was yearning experience, knowledge, and soul-searching (not much different from anyone at that age). My regret and advice to future self is to be more brave, and considerate, as walls such as this one should not prevent people from growing and learning, neither physically nor mentally, and our current restraints should not define our future. * * * * * * #ichbineinberliner #berlin #peace #coldwar #berlinwall #streetart #summerschool #balkans #stereotypes #prejudice #decolonizeeducation #decolonize #learn #travel #borderpatrol #eu #moscow #china #everywhere #anywhere #кошка #movingwomxn

(@ichnip)

5 Days 16 Hours Ago

reaching for a tiny piece of breath within academia... no es, no fue, ni lo será fácil. But I stay reaching. It is my breath I control. Academia can challenge me, throw me off the boat- into a whirlpool of mental health destruction. But I will never let go- of my dream, of the justice my ancestors deserve. This institution was not made to serve me, but I, along with other warriors, am changing hxstory. #educate2liberate #decolonizeeducation 🍃🐛🦋

(@kimberlyalyssagill)

6 Days 18 Hours Ago

Educators: whose voices, standards, methodologies, and values are you emphasizing in your courses? Are you equitably representing the diversity of perspectives in your subject area? Are you perpetuating the intergenerational trauma of people made vulnerable via western imperialist society? Is the material culturally relevant and working to dismantle the colonization of Indigenous and marginalized knowledge systems? Are you asking your students to contribute and seek out theirs and others’ work? #decolonizeyoursyllabus #decolonize #decolonizeeducation

(@fabbananafam)

8 Days 1 Hour Ago

#repost @theparallelnarrative ・・・ Here's a wonderful resource put together by @batescollege and shared by @hereweeread . It is impeccably organized and easy to navigate. . All children deserve to see themselves reflected in great books. . The direct link is diversebookfinder.org . #diversitymatters #booksfordiversity #reprentationmatters #decolonizenow #decolonizeeducation

(@zieraad)

8 Days 18 Hours Ago

Pitch gegeven over ons lesprogramma Ancestors Unknown Nederland op de afscheidsreceptie van de scheidend bestuursvoorzitter van de ASKO scholen in Amsterdam, in aanwezigheid van de nieuwe wethouder van Amsterdam. . Een volgende stap in onze ambitie om Ancestors Unknown op elke school in Amsterdam te introduceren. Omdat wij geloven dat ieder kind toegang moet krijgen tot koloniale en migratiegeschiedenis en de kans moet krijgen om hun identiteit te versterken door in contact te komen met de eigen voorouders en familiegeschiedenis #ancestorsunknown #gedeeldegeschiedenis #decolonizedutchhistory #decolonizeeducation

(@thetableunderground)

12 Days 16 Hours Ago

Ooo these fabulous four drop some knowledge on decolonizing education and minds and all the ways race shows up in schools! Grateful to Briyana, Benny, Sebastian, and Mia for sharing so honestly! #equityineducation #thetableunderground #prestmovement #theeducationproject #youthvoices #racialjustice #decolonizeeducation

(@theparallelnarrative)

13 Days 9 Hours Ago

This is not the post you think it is. . . . This ad has been showing up in my feed over and over again for the last couple of days. . . . And all I could think was "Psshhh. Nike doesn't care. They just want to sell stuff." . . . What about the Washington Redskins? What about the Cleveland Indians? Both are teams supported by Nike. Both sporting racist names and mascots. They're cool with that. . . . What about unchecked sweatshop labor? They're cool with that. . . . Give a listen to the latest @uncolonial_history podcast episode. . . . The history of shoes. So, so good. . . . From the episode: "What is particularly amazing about Nike and Adidas is that they are two corporations that have somehow convinced us that their brands somehow have street credibility and culture. And furthermore, that their brands belong to marginalized peoples, especially black people." . . . "In some ways, these two companies have been constantly celebrating (or exploiting?) black youth culture. As well as catering to (or perhaps appropriating?) the fashion sense of black cultural centers such as Harlem and Chicago. And beyond that, both Nike and Adidas have put themselves at the center of social progress, or at least that's how they market it." . . . The episode will take you through the history of Chuck Taylor's, Adidas, Puma and Nike and folded into those histories you will find Adolf Hitler, Jesse Owens, East coast Hip-Hop and of course celebrity endorsements. . . . It's an awesome, enlightening episode that tells the parallel narratives to what's on your feet! . . . It's also hilarious. . . . I think my favorite quote from the episode is : "During the 1500's, the Persian Cavalry wore high heels for better horseback riding positions. And when these guys visited Europe, all of Europe's elite men said 'Wow. High heels. SO cool!" . . . Now, I'm not telling you what to do with your shoes. . . . I'm just telling you again, know your history. Know your history. Know your history. . . , #westandwithkap but we don't need to buy Nikes to prove it. . . . #decolonizehistory #decolonizeeducation #knowyourhistory #istandwithkap #istandwithkaepernick

(@zieraad)

13 Days 18 Hours Ago

Werkbezoek aan het Mauritshuis op uitnodiging van de afdeling Educatie, die interesse tonen in ons lesprogramma Ancestors Unknown. Meer weten over ons lesprogramma ? Bezoek onze website of kijk op nl.ancestors-unknown.org #ancestorsunknown #mauritshuis #decolonizethemuseum #decolonizeeducation

(@theparallelnarrative)

15 Days 9 Hours Ago

We started our intentional studies (ahem school) today. Did you? . . . This is my sons crazy written narration that I didn't even ask him to do, but he did anyway. . . . It says: The Spanish came and were here for a little while. But the Pueblo fought back and they won. The Spanish took over again, but the Pueblo kept on in Ceremonies. In their Kivas. . . . We can't know what our students will remember from their time with us as their teachers. . . . Whether you are a home educator, or a classroom teacher, here's to teaching things we value, things we are passionate about. . . . And here's to honoring our students understanding of their own interests and passions as we meet them where they are. . . Hope everyone has a great first week! 💙 . . . #homeeducator #homeschool #charlottemasonirl #historylesson #homeschoolhistorylesson #decolonizeeducation #decolonizehistory #bravewriterlifestyle #narration

(@jaimiewhoneedsaninstagraamm)

19 Days 13 Hours Ago

My daughter’s worth will never be based on her school grades B!!!! Now while I encourage her to do her best in EVERYTHING she does, including her school work, I also continually discuss all of the things that are problematic in our educational system with her. She understands that some students learn differently from her and their grades are not an indication of their worth or even their true intelligence. Look fam people write whole ass books on the problems within our institutions of learning at all levels. The pressure children are under to excel in sometimes very racist and misogynistic institutions of learning is unacceptable. We cannot ignore these intersections in our school systems. What I AM TRULY concerned with is my daughter’s emotional intelligence. Can you process your emotions in a healthy way? Can you unpack and investigate the roots of your behaviors to understand why you are feeling anger, sadness, frustration, etc. We have higher expectations for our children then we do our damn selves! We demand that our children control their emotions that we can’t even control ourselves!!! We punish our children when they have bad days and they’re moody or sad or angry or disengaged. The same bad days and reactions we have as adults! Like what?! That’s wild! I cannot stress the importance of emotional intelligence enough! These are the tools that really help our children navigate through all aspects of life. Not 1 + 1 is 2. I am not invalidating the importance of an education. But what are our schools really educating our children about anyways?! Because let me tell you about what they’re teaching 5th graders about American History! It’s truly laughable. Marley wants to set her history book on fire on a daily basis. 😂😂 My point is a child’s worth is not based on some arbitrary method of state testing an outdated source material that contains all types of historical amnesia! Advocate for your children’s mental health and well being and decolonize their education!

(@zieraad)

23 Days 13 Hours Ago

Quote of the day! Dit is wat ons drijft om kinderen in contact te brengen met hun voorouders en hun familiegeschiedenis. Check het lesprogramma Ancestors Unknown op nl.ancestors-unknown.org #ancestorsunknown #decolonizeeducation #decolonizedutchhistory #gedeeldegeschiedenis

(@patricia.lubeck)

23 Days 13 Hours Ago

When they go off to school and you need some extra mojo to hope their experience will be loving and gentle and stimulating! In Germany, children craft their own 'Schultüte' in nursery. The parents then fill the bag with simple treats. At the end of the first day, the child gets to open the bag. It's fun! One right of passage to witness a first step of coming of age! In many cases this mean the child will now face 12 years of sitting still. Of shutting up. Of writing what they want to hear. In some cases this means socialising, learning and connecting to nature, finding a deeper understanding of the world around! I wish my experiences had been the second kind. Sadly they weren't. And more sadly, there are so many out there who had worse experiences - or don't get to ever enjoy education... Nearly 20 years after starting my education, I am finally done. Thank God. But more importantly, nearly 20 years later I have rediscovered my love for making belief. For playing in the Mudd, for making playdough out of flower, for learning the names of Dinos and flowers. For learning new songs to quiet the sobbs and new signs to communicate with those who have not learned to speak (yet). I am so grateful to be surrounded by children every day. For they teach me that learning is natural and exciting, even in a world that tried all they could to make it stop! What a blessing this new generation is! #startingschool #schultüte #education #decolonizeeducation #naturallearning #childrenknow #letthemthrive #gentleparenting #lovinglife #staycurious #wildchild #nextgeneration #theoneswevebeenwaitingfor #naturalplay #wonder #sparkle #mermaids

(@theparallelnarrative)

27 Days 18 Hours Ago

Thank you, thank you to everyone who chimed in on my last post. Your feedback is so helpful and much appreciated! . . . The overall consensus seems to be both a longer list and a shorter, best of/highlights section. I can do that. And you know what? That makes total sense! So again, thanks. 💙 . . . . #livingbooks #livingbooklist #charlottemasonirl #decolonizeeducation #decolonizingeducation #ownvoices #bookstagram #readaloud #bravewriterlifestyle #homeschoolhistory #homeschoolhistorylesson #woketeachers #woketeachersmakewokestudents #

(@tirsatalks)

2018-08-17 13:15:50

yesterday, I came by a incredibly cute black owned business in amsterdam : @educulture.store 🕺🏿🕺🏿 . inside, i found tons of stories about adventures of girls who looked like me! 🧚🏾‍♀️ . as a kid, i was a total bookworm 🤓 (even without glasses!) and it makes me so excited to know that girls today (including the child in me! 👩🏾‍🏫) are able to see themselves reflected as black girl sheros 🕵🏽‍♀ ! (peep the @iamshero_org totebag!) . to make everything better, i happened to be wearing this harriet tubman t-shirt that @shenelvabooij got me 🙌🏾, and was able to learn more about her story in a cute illustrated biography from the "little people big dreams" series 😊 . now i am able to honor harriet tubman's legacy with even more respect and knowledge! like, did you know her name was really minty? and that she changed it for safety? or did you know rosa parks didn't sit in the "whites only" section of the bus?! she sat in the flexible zone where black people could only sit until ONE white person wanted to sit there..!! my mind was kinda blown 🤯; not only because of what i now know, but because i didn't even know.. 🤔 . these are the stories that need to be told. these are the histories we must remember. and thanks to @educulture.store and all the amazing people who help tell our herstories. 👩🏾‍🏫🙌🏾✊🏾 . so let's help each other learn! what are some awesome herstory facts that more people should know about? please share them below so we can all geek out! 🤓🤓🤓 #supportblackownedbusinesses #blackownedbusiness #bob

(@owlandpanther)

2018-08-15 18:30:18

#representationmatters Regrann from @theconsciouskid - '"Diné Bí Ná’álkid Time!” is the first educational Navajo and English puppet show to teach the Navajo language and culture through digital media. Dr. Shawna Begay and Charmaine Jackson teamed up to produce the show, which is geared toward pre-school students ages 4 to 6-years-old to teach them the Navajo language and culture for the purposes of saving, rejuvenating and revitalizing the language through educational media. Begay said one of the inspirations for the project was her own background. She never learned Navajo when she was younger and it was not until she was older that she realized how valuable the language is to the livelihood of the Navajo Nation. The stereotypical images of Native Americans on screen also influenced what people thought of her — that she lived in a teepee or wore a headdress. It was those experiences that influenced Begay’s decision to get involved in film work and eventually why she decided she wanted to leverage educational media for language revitalization. “Language develops at birth and as a child I wish I would have been taught the Navajo language,” Begay said. “I remembered watching “Sesame Street” at that young age and learned my English letters and numbers. It occurred to me, what if I had access to a Navajo “Sesame Street” or a show that was in the Navajo language — would I have been more inspired and motivated to learn the language when I had access to it with my grandparents?” Begay said she thought about just approaching PBS and “Sesame Street” and asking to dub the shows into Navajo, but discarded that idea because she felt it was too easy. “I realized I needed to decolonize “Sesame Street,” Begay said. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that “Sesame Street” is bad, but it perpetuates western thinking and learning objectives. As Navajo people, we have our own learning objectives and Navajo way of knowing, which are completely different from Euro-western schooling. And so, I had to develop our own curriculum guide that is meant to teach Navajo through media.” (Navajo-Hopi Observer) #navajo #sesamestreet #decolonize #decolonizeeducation #indigenous #education

(@theparallelnarrative)

2018-08-15 07:18:19

Do you have a teen that loves graphic novels? If you do, this post is for you. . . . Thi Bui's graphic novel The Best We Could Do is a heartfelt, gut wrenching and realistic view of the Vietnam war. . . . I love her pallet of oranges and warm grays. . . . Bui's storytelling and memories revolve around her family's stories and history of the war. It's very personal. . . . So often, stories of war, especially those in textbooks or surveys lack a personal perspective. The war ends, and we don't see how families have to endure after the trauma. . . . When my boys are older, I will not censor their reading. Personally, I think it best for kids to experience some things through books, rather than real life experiences. . . . War, neglect, abusive relationships...I hope they never have to know those things first hand. . . . Not everyone has that privilege. . . . I only mention that incase you are not comfortable with your child reading about such things. If that's you, you might want to give this book a glance before putting it into your child's hands. . . . This one is definitely going on the High School list for The Vietnam War. . . . #vietnamwar #vietnam #decolonizeeducation #knowyourhistory #theparallelnarrative20thcentury #theparallelnarrativevietnamwar #graphicnovel #bookstagram #historylessons #livingbooks #livingbook #homeschoolhistory #historyforhomeschoolers

(@paloma_guerrera)

2018-08-12 13:44:55

#repost @theconsciouskid with @get_repost ・・・ '"Diné Bí Ná’álkid Time!” is the first educational Navajo and English puppet show to teach the Navajo language and culture through digital media. Dr. Shawna Begay and Charmaine Jackson teamed up to produce the show, which is geared toward pre-school students ages 4 to 6-years-old to teach them the Navajo language and culture for the purposes of saving, rejuvenating and revitalizing the language through educational media. Begay said one of the inspirations for the project was her own background. She never learned Navajo when she was younger and it was not until she was older that she realized how valuable the language is to the livelihood of the Navajo Nation. The stereotypical images of Native Americans on screen also influenced what people thought of her — that she lived in a teepee or wore a headdress. It was those experiences that influenced Begay’s decision to get involved in film work and eventually why she decided she wanted to leverage educational media for language revitalization. “Language develops at birth and as a child I wish I would have been taught the Navajo language,” Begay said. “I remembered watching “Sesame Street” at that young age and learned my English letters and numbers. It occurred to me, what if I had access to a Navajo “Sesame Street” or a show that was in the Navajo language — would I have been more inspired and motivated to learn the language when I had access to it with my grandparents?” Begay said she thought about just approaching PBS and “Sesame Street” and asking to dub the shows into Navajo, but discarded that idea because she felt it was too easy. “I realized I needed to decolonize “Sesame Street,” Begay said. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that “Sesame Street” is bad, but it perpetuates western thinking and learning objectives. As Navajo people, we have our own learning objectives and Navajo way of knowing, which are completely different from Euro-western schooling. And so, I had to develop our own curriculum guide that is meant to teach Navajo through media.” (Navajo-Hopi Observer) #navajo #sesamestreet #decolonize #decolonizeeducation #indigenous #education

(@sarahsteachingpoints)

2018-08-11 13:46:07

#repost @theconsciouskid with @get_repost ・・・ '"Diné Bí Ná’álkid Time!” is the first educational Navajo and English puppet show to teach the Navajo language and culture through digital media. Dr. Shawna Begay and Charmaine Jackson teamed up to produce the show, which is geared toward pre-school students ages 4 to 6-years-old to teach them the Navajo language and culture for the purposes of saving, rejuvenating and revitalizing the language through educational media. Begay said one of the inspirations for the project was her own background. She never learned Navajo when she was younger and it was not until she was older that she realized how valuable the language is to the livelihood of the Navajo Nation. The stereotypical images of Native Americans on screen also influenced what people thought of her — that she lived in a teepee or wore a headdress. It was those experiences that influenced Begay’s decision to get involved in film work and eventually why she decided she wanted to leverage educational media for language revitalization. “Language develops at birth and as a child I wish I would have been taught the Navajo language,” Begay said. “I remembered watching “Sesame Street” at that young age and learned my English letters and numbers. It occurred to me, what if I had access to a Navajo “Sesame Street” or a show that was in the Navajo language — would I have been more inspired and motivated to learn the language when I had access to it with my grandparents?” Begay said she thought about just approaching PBS and “Sesame Street” and asking to dub the shows into Navajo, but discarded that idea because she felt it was too easy. “I realized I needed to decolonize “Sesame Street,” Begay said. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that “Sesame Street” is bad, but it perpetuates western thinking and learning objectives. As Navajo people, we have our own learning objectives and Navajo way of knowing, which are completely different from Euro-western schooling. And so, I had to develop our own curriculum guide that is meant to teach Navajo through media.” (Navajo-Hopi Observer) #navajo #sesamestreet #decolonize #decolonizeeducation #indigenous #education

(@this.day.we.fight)

2018-08-11 10:09:02

Regrann from theconsciouskid - '"Diné Bí Ná’álkid Time!” is the first educational Navajo and English puppet show to teach the Navajo language and culture through digital media. Dr. Shawna Begay and Charmaine Jackson teamed up to produce the show, which is geared toward pre-school students ages 4 to 6-years-old to teach them the Navajo language and culture for the purposes of saving, rejuvenating and revitalizing the language through educational media. Begay said one of the inspirations for the project was her own background. She never learned Navajo when she was younger and it was not until she was older that she realized how valuable the language is to the livelihood of the Navajo Nation. The stereotypical images of Native Americans on screen also influenced what people thought of her — that she lived in a teepee or wore a headdress. It was those experiences that influenced Begay’s decision to get involved in film work and eventually why she decided she wanted to leverage educational media for language revitalization. “Language develops at birth and as a child I wish I would have been taught the Navajo language,” Begay said. “I remembered watching “Sesame Street” at that young age and learned my English letters and numbers. It occurred to me, what if I had access to a Navajo “Sesame Street” or a show that was in the Navajo language — would I have been more inspired and motivated to learn the language when I had access to it with my grandparents?” Begay said she thought about just approaching PBS and “Sesame Street” and asking to dub the shows into Navajo, but discarded that idea because she felt it was too easy. “I realized I needed to decolonize “Sesame Street,” Begay said. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that “Sesame Street” is bad, but it perpetuates western thinking and learning objectives. As Navajo people, we have our own learning objectives and Navajo way of knowing, which are completely different from Euro-western schooling. And so, I had to develop our own curriculum guide that is meant to teach Navajo through media.” (Navajo-Hopi Observer) #navajo #sesamestreet #decolonize #decolonizeeducation #indigenous #education🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋

(@hello.errthling)

2018-08-11 09:12:28

#repost @theconsciouskid ・・・ '"Diné Bí Ná’álkid Time!” is the first educational Navajo and English puppet show to teach the Navajo language and culture through digital media. Dr. Shawna Begay and Charmaine Jackson teamed up to produce the show, which is geared toward pre-school students ages 4 to 6-years-old to teach them the Navajo language and culture for the purposes of saving, rejuvenating and revitalizing the language through educational media. Begay said one of the inspirations for the project was her own background. She never learned Navajo when she was younger and it was not until she was older that she realized how valuable the language is to the livelihood of the Navajo Nation. The stereotypical images of Native Americans on screen also influenced what people thought of her — that she lived in a teepee or wore a headdress. It was those experiences that influenced Begay’s decision to get involved in film work and eventually why she decided she wanted to leverage educational media for language revitalization. “Language develops at birth and as a child I wish I would have been taught the Navajo language,” Begay said. “I remembered watching “Sesame Street” at that young age and learned my English letters and numbers. It occurred to me, what if I had access to a Navajo “Sesame Street” or a show that was in the Navajo language — would I have been more inspired and motivated to learn the language when I had access to it with my grandparents?” Begay said she thought about just approaching PBS and “Sesame Street” and asking to dub the shows into Navajo, but discarded that idea because she felt it was too easy. “I realized I needed to decolonize “Sesame Street,” Begay said. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that “Sesame Street” is bad, but it perpetuates western thinking and learning objectives. As Navajo people, we have our own learning objectives and Navajo way of knowing, which are completely different from Euro-western schooling. And so, I had to develop our own curriculum guide that is meant to teach Navajo through media.” (Navajo-Hopi Observer) #navajo #sesamestreet #decolonize #decolonizeeducation #indigenous #education

(@the.dinosaur.teacher)

2018-08-11 08:49:10

#repost @theconsciouskid ・・・ '"Diné Bí Ná’álkid Time!” is the first educational Navajo and English puppet show to teach the Navajo language and culture through digital media. Dr. Shawna Begay and Charmaine Jackson teamed up to produce the show, which is geared toward pre-school students ages 4 to 6-years-old to teach them the Navajo language and culture for the purposes of saving, rejuvenating and revitalizing the language through educational media. Begay said one of the inspirations for the project was her own background. She never learned Navajo when she was younger and it was not until she was older that she realized how valuable the language is to the livelihood of the Navajo Nation. The stereotypical images of Native Americans on screen also influenced what people thought of her — that she lived in a teepee or wore a headdress. It was those experiences that influenced Begay’s decision to get involved in film work and eventually why she decided she wanted to leverage educational media for language revitalization. “Language develops at birth and as a child I wish I would have been taught the Navajo language,” Begay said. “I remembered watching “Sesame Street” at that young age and learned my English letters and numbers. It occurred to me, what if I had access to a Navajo “Sesame Street” or a show that was in the Navajo language — would I have been more inspired and motivated to learn the language when I had access to it with my grandparents?” Begay said she thought about just approaching PBS and “Sesame Street” and asking to dub the shows into Navajo, but discarded that idea because she felt it was too easy. “I realized I needed to decolonize “Sesame Street,” Begay said. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that “Sesame Street” is bad, but it perpetuates western thinking and learning objectives. As Navajo people, we have our own learning objectives and Navajo way of knowing, which are completely different from Euro-western schooling. And so, I had to develop our own curriculum guide that is meant to teach Navajo through media.” (Navajo-Hopi Observer) #navajo #sesamestreet #decolonize #decolonizeeducation #indigenous #education

(@thehoodreporter)

2018-08-11 08:14:27

#repost @theconsciouskid with @get_repost ・・・ '"Diné Bí Ná’álkid Time!” is the first educational Navajo and English puppet show to teach the Navajo language and culture through digital media. Dr. Shawna Begay and Charmaine Jackson teamed up to produce the show, which is geared toward pre-school students ages 4 to 6-years-old to teach them the Navajo language and culture for the purposes of saving, rejuvenating and revitalizing the language through educational media. Begay said one of the inspirations for the project was her own background. She never learned Navajo when she was younger and it was not until she was older that she realized how valuable the language is to the livelihood of the Navajo Nation. The stereotypical images of Native Americans on screen also influenced what people thought of her — that she lived in a teepee or wore a headdress. It was those experiences that influenced Begay’s decision to get involved in film work and eventually why she decided she wanted to leverage educational media for language revitalization. “Language develops at birth and as a child I wish I would have been taught the Navajo language,” Begay said. “I remembered watching “Sesame Street” at that young age and learned my English letters and numbers. It occurred to me, what if I had access to a Navajo “Sesame Street” or a show that was in the Navajo language — would I have been more inspired and motivated to learn the language when I had access to it with my grandparents?” Begay said she thought about just approaching PBS and “Sesame Street” and asking to dub the shows into Navajo, but discarded that idea because she felt it was too easy. “I realized I needed to decolonize “Sesame Street,” Begay said. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that “Sesame Street” is bad, but it perpetuates western thinking and learning objectives. As Navajo people, we have our own learning objectives and Navajo way of knowing, which are completely different from Euro-western schooling. And so, I had to develop our own curriculum guide that is meant to teach Navajo through media.” (Navajo-Hopi Observer) #navajo #sesamestreet #decolonize #decolonizeeducation #indigenous #education

(@theconsciouskid)

2018-08-11 08:10:38

'"Diné Bí Ná’álkid Time!” is the first educational Navajo and English puppet show to teach the Navajo language and culture through digital media. Dr. Shawna Begay and Charmaine Jackson teamed up to produce the show, which is geared toward pre-school students ages 4 to 6-years-old to teach them the Navajo language and culture for the purposes of saving, rejuvenating and revitalizing the language through educational media. Begay said one of the inspirations for the project was her own background. She never learned Navajo when she was younger and it was not until she was older that she realized how valuable the language is to the livelihood of the Navajo Nation. The stereotypical images of Native Americans on screen also influenced what people thought of her — that she lived in a teepee or wore a headdress. It was those experiences that influenced Begay’s decision to get involved in film work and eventually why she decided she wanted to leverage educational media for language revitalization. “Language develops at birth and as a child I wish I would have been taught the Navajo language,” Begay said. “I remembered watching “Sesame Street” at that young age and learned my English letters and numbers. It occurred to me, what if I had access to a Navajo “Sesame Street” or a show that was in the Navajo language — would I have been more inspired and motivated to learn the language when I had access to it with my grandparents?” Begay said she thought about just approaching PBS and “Sesame Street” and asking to dub the shows into Navajo, but discarded that idea because she felt it was too easy. “I realized I needed to decolonize “Sesame Street,” Begay said. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that “Sesame Street” is bad, but it perpetuates western thinking and learning objectives. As Navajo people, we have our own learning objectives and Navajo way of knowing, which are completely different from Euro-western schooling. And so, I had to develop our own curriculum guide that is meant to teach Navajo through media.” (Navajo-Hopi Observer) #navajo #sesamestreet #decolonize #decolonizeeducation #indigenous #education

(@chichiofafrica)

2018-08-09 06:59:21

YAS!! The anti-Colonial education revolution is slowing making its way to Anambra. Two days ago, I had a lovely and intellectually energizing time with the Commissioner of Education, Anambra- Prof. Kate Omenugha...we talked about the gaps in the education system in Anambra and how I can help. I also briefly met the Perm. Secertary and another Ministry official - Fr. Adolphus, who happens to be an Ontario Certified Teacher! Fingers Crossed, Fingers Crossed, Fingers Crossed.. some meaningful continental conversations about cultural and inclusive education reform might be emerging from Anambra State.. THe SOUTH EAST must UNITE oooo we must fashion out a regional plan for education reform— we must develop our next generation of regional leaders that will push the country, continent and world closer to justice, prosperity and humanization for all #decolonizeeducation #educationreform #africanrenaissance #nigeria #anambrastate

(@metro_css)

2018-08-01 11:33:40

At CSS, we aim to provide training sessions that are appropriate for all levels of experience with racial and social justice work. We are here to support our district and company leaders on their path to disrupting and dismantling systems of oppression within their spheres of influence ✨ • • • • #decolonizinged #nyumetro #nyc #nycdoe #nyu #nycteacher #ccer #culturallyresponsiveteaching #blackisbeautiful #criticalconsciousness #culturallyresponsive #booknerd #bookworm #library #belletrist #equity #diversity #selfreflection #publiceducation ##css #ourchildren #studentsfirst #teacherorganizing #restorativejustice #racialliteracy #racialjustice #brownvboardofed #esicreates #equityineducation #decolonizeeducation

(@theparallelnarrative)

2018-08-02 10:25:18

Here is the only picture book I can find that tells the story of Thomas Jefferson's enslaved children. . . . It's a welcome perspective. Most children's books cater to 1-dimensional moral greatness when it comes to Presidents. . . . Told in a first person narrative, James looks back at his enslaved childhood at Monticello. . . . He recalls when he learned that his master was also his Father. He recalls living a life of secrecy and distance. . . . He looks back with confusion, sadness and anger. . . . While you might be left wanting more as an adult reader, It's important to keep in mind this book is written for young children. . . . They will connect with the boys desire for a relationship with his Father. They will connect with the confusion James feels about his place and the relationship between his parents. . . . This is not a love story. . . . And that in itself is a breath of fresh air when it comes to the discussion on Jefferson and Sally Hemings. . . . She was not his mistress. . . . She was his property. . . . He did not free her when he died. . . . That's all in this book. . . . This book would be a great read to include when you are learning about Jefferson. It speaks to the complexity of him, his character and our country's history. . . . My Name is James Madison Hemings by Jonah Winter and Terry Widener. . . . Swipe to see several pages from the book. . . . #theparallelnarrative19thcentury #theparallelnarrativethomasjefferson #theparallelnarrativeslavery #theparallelnarrativepresidents #decolonizeeducation #sallyhemings #teachyourchildrenwell #livingbooks #historylesson #homeschoolhistory #readaloud #readaloudforhistory #livinghistorybook #teachthetruth

(@thebrooklyngreenschool)

2018-08-01 18:07:51

We are proud to have a NYU Decolonizing Education conference presenter on our faculty team. #decolonizeeducation #decolonizeed #wokeeducators #ccers2018 #nyumetrocenter @metrocenter_css metro