#gottem

92,755 posts tagged with #gottem

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(@crfixcrss)

3 Hours Ago

#gottem

(@d_malvar)

4 Hours Ago

You can be deep but you can't be Sandeep.

(@neekawleus)

4 Hours Ago

This is me showing my incredible escape from the 💀 deadly 💀 nipple twist of @jeanphilippe1018 . I will be giving a seminar on the specific skills set required to escape such attacks in September 2018 in Ottawa. DM for details! My famous assistant @urmagurtle will be there too. #freemynipples #gottem #allomonsieur

(@hold_my_beir)

5 Hours Ago

#gottem

(@1stnut)

6 Hours Ago

The sweetest victory is the one that’s most difficult. The one that requires you to reach down deep inside, to fight with everything you’ve got, to be willing to leave everything out there on the battlefield—without knowing, until that do-or-die moment, if your heroic effort will be enough. Society doesn’t reward defeat, and you won’t find many failures documented in history books. The exceptions are those failures that become steppingstones to later success. Such is the case with Thomas Edison, whose most memorable invention was the light bulb, which purportedly took him 1,000 tries before he developed a successful prototype. “How did it feel to fail 1,000 times?” a reporter asked. “I didn’t fail 1,000 times,” Edison responded. “The light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps.” Unlike Edison, many of us avoid the prospect of failure. In fact, we’re so focused on not failing that we don’t aim for success, settling instead for a life of mediocrity. When we do make missteps, we gloss over them, selectively editing out the miscalculations or mistakes in our life’s résumé. “Failure is not an option,” NASA flight controller Jerry C. Bostick reportedly stated during the mission to bring the damaged Apollo 13 back to Earth, and that phrase has been etched into the collective memory ever since. To many in our success-driven society, failure isn’t just considered a non-option—it’s deemed a deficiency, says Kathryn Schulz, author of Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error. “Of all the things we are wrong about, this idea of error might well top the list,” Schulz says. “It is our meta-mistake: We are wrong about what it means to be wrong. Far from being a sign of intellectual inferiority, the capacity to err is crucial to human cognition.” #vbucksgiveaway #sike #gottem #gay #retard